Accelerated Startup – Talk by Vitaly Golomb

vitalygolomb Wednesday, December 2 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
 The Pad, 1370 Willow Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025

Sponsored by
THEPAD_logo_medium

Accelerated Startup

Traditional business schools are not prepared to provide the evolving skills and mentorship required to build tomorrow’s billion dollar companies. Many are choosing to apply to accelerators instead of MBAs and learn by doing at a rapid pace. Vitaly’s upcoming book provides all of the latest tools and techniques used by the world’s top accelerator programs to manufacture successful startups. In this dynamic presentation, Vitaly discusses innovation’s importance to society, why accelerators are the new MBA, and how to get into and leverage the top programs.

Event Details

6-7 PM: Check-in, food & networking
7-8 PM: Speaker & Q&A
8-9 PM: Networking

Vitaly M. Golomb is a Silicon Valley-based entrepreneur, investor, and author. He has spent his career in technology startups, international venture capital, as well as the printing and marketing services industries. He is the Founding Partner of CCC Startups, Executive Producer of the Startup AddVenture conference series, and Author of Accelerated Startup – The New Business School. He was previously the CEO of Keen Systems (Acquired by Aleyant) a venture capital-backed SaaS ecommerce platform for the printing industry and the CEO of Sputnik Integrated, an international, award-winning design and marketing firm.

Vitaly grew up in Cupertino and has been involved with startups since his teenage years. He has founded multiple companies and VC-backed startups. He holds a degree in Computer and Video Imaging and has guest lectured at Stanford, UC Berkeley, St. Mary’s and other universities around the world on entrepreneurship, innovation, and design.

Vitaly is passionate about improving society by nurturing entrepreneurship around the world. He is contributing writer for TechCrunch and other publications and has been a consistently top-ranked mentor at a number of startup accelerator programs in US and Europe. He travels to over 20 countries every year as a keynote speaker. He consults and teaches workshops to the next generation of entrepreneurs, as well as enterprises and governments fostering innovation.

His new book, Accelerated Startup – The New Business School, is the Pocket MBA for the 21st century. Traditional business schools are not prepared to provide the evolving skills and mentorship required to build tomorrow’s billion dollar companies. Many are choosing to apply to accelerators instead of MBAs and learn by doing at a rapid pace. The book provides all of the latest tools and techniques used by the world’s top accelerator programs to manufacture successful startups. Pre-order the book: http://www.golomb.net/book


Ron Lichty on “If We’re Agile, Why Do We Need Managers?”

Ron Lichty

Tuesday, October 27 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Oration, 989 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Suite 450, Foster City, CA

Sponsored by
Oration

About the Talk

A common misconception about agile is that managers are unnecessary. After all, agile is based on self-organizing teams. If the teams organize themselves, what do managers do?

Unfortunately, most scrum training plays into that. Think about it: how many trainers or coaches have you seen sketch the structure of a scrum team with a drawing that includes a manager? While there’s always a scrum master and a product owner, the core team and maybe some stakeholders, have you ever seen a manager in that drawing?

This misconception can be a problem all around: A frequently cited barrier to agile adoption is managers who don’t know what to do when their teams become self-managing. When they’re not included in training, how would they (or anyone else, for that matter) know how to characterize their role. At the same time, organizations often lay down expectations of managers, some compatible with agile, some not.

Agile has clearly shifted the old roles and responsibilities. Managers bent on command-and-control are clearly a barrier to agile adoption. But managers who take a hands-off approach or are treading water in a sea of ambiguity will almost certainly stymie adoption, as well.

Ron Lichty believes (and so do a lot of the early agile thought leaders) that managers have critical roles to play in enabling success, both of transitions to agile and of agile itself. This session is about those roles.

 

About the Event

6-7 PM: Check-in, snacks & networking
7-8 PM: Speaker & Q&A
8-9 PM: Networking

 

About the Speaker

Ron Lichty has been alternating between consulting with and managing software development and product organizations for 25 years, the last 15 of those in the era of Agile, almost all of those spent untangling the knots in software development and transforming chaos to clarity. Originally a programmer, he earned several patents and wrote two popular programming books before being hired into his first management role by Apple Computer, which nurtured his managerial growth in both development and product management roles.

Principal and owner of Ron Lichty Consulting, Inc. (www.RonLichty.com), he has trained teams in Scrum, transitioned teams from waterfall and iterative methodologies to agile, and coached teams already using agile to make their software development “hum”. In his continued search for effective best practices, Ron co-authors the annual Study of Product Team Performance.

Ron‘s most recent book is Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams – http://www.ManagingTheUnmanageable.net – co-authored with Pixar and Gracenote CTO Mickey W. Mantle. Published by Addison Wesley, it has been compared by reviewers to software development classics, The Mythical Man-Month and Peopleware.

Ron has repeatedly been brought in as an acting CTO and interim vice president of engineering to solve development team challenges. During Ron‘s first three years at Charles Schwab, he led software development of the first investor tools on Schwab.com, playing a role in transforming the bricks-and-mortar discount brokerage into a premier name in online financial services. He was promoted to Schwab vice president while leading his CIO’s three-year technology initiative to migrate software development from any-language-goes to a single, cost-effective platform company-wide and nurturing Schwab’s nascent efforts to leverage early Agile approaches. He has led products and development across a wide range of domains for companies of all sizes, from startups to the Fortune 500, including Fujitsu, Razorfish, Stanford, and Apple.

Ron has been an adviser to a half-dozen start-ups. He co-chaired SVForum’s Engineering Leadership SIG; founded its Software Architecture SIG; chaired its Emerging Technology SIG and the East Bay Innovation Group’s Software Development Best Practices SIG; and was a member of SVForum’s board.


Tristan Kromer on How to Run Lean Startup Experiments

Tristan Kromer

Tuesday, September 22 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Oration, 989 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Suite 450, Foster City, CA

Sponsored by
Oration

About the Talk

How do we run lean startup experiments?

When I was studying marketing I had an arms length list of research techniques like conjoint analysissurveys, and focus groups. After I read Four Steps to the Epiphany, there was only one: Get out of the building and talk to customers!

At LUXr, Janice Fraser introduced me to a whole new host of tools to gain insight such as hallway usability testing, contextual inquiry, and mental models.

Add this to lean startup standards like smoke tests and it’s a pretty overwhelming.

Should we run a Pocket Test with Picnic in the Graveyard to follow up? Should we do a Wizard of Oz or a concierge approach? Would you like a lemon twist with that?

So what type of experiment should you run? And when?

 

About the Event

6-7 PM: Check-in, snacks & networking
7-8 PM: Speaker & Q&A
8-9 PM: Networking

 

About the Speaker

Tristan Kromer helps product teams go fast.

As a lean startup coach, he works with innovation teams to run at least one experiment/research per week to improve their product and business model.

For larger companies and governments, Tristan and his team work with teams and leaders to build innovation ecosystems. They have worked with companies ranging from early stage startups with zero revenue to established businesses with >$10M USD revenue (Kiva, JustAnswer, StumbleUpon) to enterprise companies with >$1B USD revenue. (Swisscom, Pitney Bowes, Fujitsu, LinkedIn)

With his remaining hours, Tristan volunteers his time with Lean Startup Circle and blogs at GrasshopperHerder.com.


Laura Klein on The Three Reasons Your Visitors Don’t Convert

Laura_Klein_200px

Tuesday, August 25 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Oration, 989 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Suite 450, Foster City, CA

Sponsored by
Oration

About the Talk

Laura Klein, author of UX for Lean Startups, will explain the three ways your product may be failing to convert visitors into users or users into customers. By improving your real conversion rate, you’ll grow your product faster and more cheaply, because you won’t be wasting time and money acquiring users who will never deliver value to your company.

 

About the Event

6-7 PM: Check-in, snacks & networking
7-8 PM: Speaker & Q&A
8-9 PM: Networking

 

About the Speaker

Laura fell in love with technology when she saw her first user research session in 1995. Since then, she’s worked as an engineer, UX designer, and product manager at both startups and large companies in Silicon Valley. Her popular design blog, Users Know, and her book, UX for Lean Startups, help teams learn more about their users and apply that knowledge to build better products. She is currently an advisor to several small startups and consults with companies that want to improve their research, UX, and product development processes. She’s working on a second book, and she’ll be giving a full day workshop on UX Design for Growth on September 15th.


Rich Mironov on Why You’ll Eventually Need a Product Manager at Your Startup

Rich Mironov

Tuesday, July 28 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Oration, 989 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Suite 450, Foster City, CA

Sponsored by
Oration     Macadamian

About the Talk

Very early stage startups (pre-revenue, 10 people or less) don’t have dedicated product managers / product owners.  But once they get to 30 people or have a few big-revenue customers, lack of product management can be disastrous.  Startup veteran Rich Mironov talks through typical symptoms for growing startups, what product managers/owners really do, and tips for scaling up.

 

About the Event

6-7 PM: Check-in, snacks & networking
7-8 PM: Speaker & Q&A
8-9 PM: Networking

 

About the Speaker

Rich Mironov is a seasoned tech executive and serial entrepreneur: the “product guy” at six start-ups including as CEO and VP Products/Marketing.  His technical roots are in B2B infrastructure and SaaS, with several “parachute jumps” into Valley software companies as Interim VP Products.  Rich has been relentlessly blogging, speaking, teaching and mentoring on software products for more than two decades.  www.Mironov.com